Articles By Author - Hunter Royall

Gaming and the Busy Adult

If you’re anything like me, you started playing roleplaying games sometime in your teens. You know, back when it was nothing to start a game Friday night, pass out from exhaustion early Saturday morning, wake up at noon and continue from the night before with a quick lunch of leftover pizza. Then one day you wake up and realize that you haven’t had a decent game session in almost a year thanks to your job, bills, and responsibilities to your...

Railroading and Your Campaign

When I was a new GM, I had a reputation for running very linear campaigns. I didn’t have enough experience with the rules or with storytelling to handle more than slight changes to a storyline; if presented with a scenario that I hadn’t planned for, I defaulted to saying it wouldn’t work and pressing my players to move on, punishing them in-game if they didn’t acquiesce. It wasn’t until years later, after I had gained a lot of experience...

The Alignment Problem

Have you tangled with alignment in your games in the past? Hunter Royall, the designer who provided us with several paladin options recently, read all of your comments to his articles and wanted to weigh in on the concept—or issue—of alignment and give you some more ideas on how to handle alignment in your game. In my fifteen years of experience playing tabletop games, no rule or game mechanic has started more arguments than the alignment...

The Paladin: Expanding the Boundaries of Faith, Part V

Through this series, I’ve argued that paladins should not be relegated to a single alignment, and I’ve given rules and advice for playing paladins of other alignments. This installment will detail my rules on playing a paladin who worships a chaotic neutral deity. If you’ve been following thus far, I hope you’ve enjoyed everything up to this point, and I hope you enjoy this last presentation. Without further ado, I present the rules for...

The Paladin: Expanding the Boundaries of Faith, Part IV

Previously I wrote about how the paladin should be expanded to allow different alignments, then laid out rules on how to adapt the paladin for the lawful neutral and lawful evil alignments. While the justicar and despot are much different than the standard paladin, they at least share the same rigid ethical structure. Today I change tack and lay out rules for playing a paladin with the same morals but much different ethics than the standard...

The Paladin: Expanding the Boundaries of Faith, Part III

In my first entry, I laid out an argument that the paladin should not be limited to such specific roles as they are and that logically every deity would want such warriors in their service. In the last entry, I gave you some rules changes to play a lawful neutral variant of the paladin I called the justicar. In this entry, I present a lawful evil variant of the paladin for your use: the despot. To use these rules, you will need the Pathfinder...

The Paladin: Expanding the Boundaries of Faith, Part II

Last time I laid out the argument that in a Pathfinder game, a paladin should not be limited to only the lawful good alignment (or, in the case of the antipaladin, chaotic evil). Following that line of logic, I present to you the first of my paladin archetypes: the justicar, paladin of order. To use these rules you will need the Pathfinder Core Rulebook, and it would help to also have the Advanced Player’s Guide. The Justicar The justicar is...

The Paladin: Expanding the Boundaries of Faith

The Paladin. To many roleplaying groups, this character doesn’t even have a name; he, or she, is simply “The Paladin,” as if there is no point in further description or that word is enough to convey the entire personality of an individual. The character’s backstory is irrelevant, the paladin’s physical features are fluff, and the player playing the paladin is subconsciously pigeonholed by friends into the role of...

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