Contested Steel: Your Chance to Win!

Posted In Articles, Front Page | 6 comments

shivLike Todd Gdula’s Real Steel series? Are you a patron of our project Streets of Zobeck for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game? Well, then you’ll love this:

We’ll award this very shiv from Real Steel, newly forged by Todd Gdula, to one lucky patron. How can you win? After selecting all six adventures for the upcoming Streets of Zobeck anthology, patrons will vote for their favorite pitch and that author takes home the blade! If either Richard Pett or Ben McFarland are chosen, the shiv will instead go to a random senior patron.

It’s your chance to win a souvenir capable of more than just a paper cut, but only  project patrons are eligible to win.

See you on the Streets of Zobeck!


  1. Sweet!


    September 7, 2010

  2. Inspiring… If I make the ‘cut’ I’ll name it after my first kill. *sniff*

    James Thomas

    September 7, 2010

  3. Sounds cool!

    Christina Stiles

    September 8, 2010

  4. A little extra incentive … not that we needed it!!

    Mike Franke

    September 8, 2010

  5. IANAL*, but it sounds like this would violate many laws on contests requiring purchases to enter.

    *rules lawyering doesn’t count.

    Miguel Valdespino

    September 9, 2010

  6. Indeed Miguel, it’s good that you raise the issue; it hadn’t occurred to me that people would view this as a contest — though I clearly should have flagged the headline as a problem.

    On further review, this could be construed as a contest of skill, and it is my understanding that this form of contest is entirely legal and above board in the State of Washington and the US. It violates no laws here.

    However, the states of Colorado, Maryland, Nebraska, North Dakota, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Vermont may not allow a contest of this kind and so will be excluded.

    The prize is given based on ability and is in addition to the value of the design service, discussion, and copy of the finished design work that all patrons receive. The purchase requirement is fairly trivial; goods and services equal to the value of the purchase are received by every entrant.

    But getting lawyers to vet this sort of giveaway does frankly take all take the fun out of giving something away. So I suspect we’ll just use future cool items as gifts to major donors or sponsors rather than attempt a skill contest, to avoid legal jeopardy, confusion, or the (false) perception that we’re wrangling for dollars.

    The project commission is already met; I was hoping to do something cool primarily for existing participants.

    If you have other concerns, let me know.


    September 9, 2010

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